Read an Excerpt from The Beasts of Belladonna

If the short story collections of John Cheever and Flannery O’Connor had a love child, it would be The Beasts of Belladonna. Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking, Gilbert Allen’s collection of fifteen linked stories explores every corner of the suburbanized foothills of South Carolina.

Read an Excerpt from Coyote Fork

A timely, stylishly written, and brilliantly conceived metaphysical thriller, Coyote Fork carries us on an unforgettable journey, before bringing us face to face with the darkness at the heart of Silicon Valley itself.

Read an Excerpt from Entangled Objects

All three characters in this novel confront the question: when are we most ourselves—when we realize the selves we aspire to, or when we are unadorned? The characters converge on the same place: as they come together, each will come away changed.

Read an Excerpt from Thunderhead

The lyric poems in Phillippo’s radiant debut collection Thunderhead explore faith, motherhood, family, and community. As the author has put it, she has lived her life “backwards,” first raising a large family, then going back to school, and only now seeing her work find its way into print.

Read an Excerpt from All in a Garden Green

In All in a Garden Green, thirteen-year-old Erica Pickins walks through a door of the old manor house, Hengrave Hall, on a family visit to England and finds herself mistaken for the elder daughter of the house, Margaret, in the year 1578. Queen Elizabeth herself is about to arrive on a royal visit, and, because of her musical talent, Erica becomes the most important part of the desperate attempts by the Catholic family to entertain the Protestant Queen.

Read an Excerpt from The Age of Infidelity and Other Stories

In the spirit of Muriel Spark and Walker Percy, The Age of Infidelity’s eleven stories embrace the comic, the absurd, and the dead serious. These stories travel through time, set in landscapes from the small-town South to New York City, from a parched Midwest to a deserted Dublin where American ex-pats hunker, these stories time-travel from our Jim Crow past to an imagined future of warehouses for the aged where robots do the nursing, where pet dogs commit suicide while young mothers spin yarns.

Read an Excerpt from Toward

The poems in Toward inhabit the landscapes and seascapes of the wild southwest of Ireland, the islands of America’s Pacific Northwest, the poet’s home in Massachusetts, and then round again, back to the land north of Dublin. Moira Linehan’s eye and imagination capture lyrical, sonic, and imagistic details of these places. So, too, their embedded history: the Famine, the days of the whaling industry, and the speaker’s paternal genealogy are all woven in.

Review: Long after Lauds

Peggy Rosenthal reviews Long after Lauds in Christian Century: “These poems probe what God and human life are like long after you can simply praise them. With delightful wit and grace, Hathaway explores in these poems what it means to live a secular life after being grounded in Christian community.”

Read an Excerpt from Woe to the Scribes and Pharisees

“Somebody we’ve all heard of once turned water into wine. With this project it’s more like turning vinegar into arsenic. In the first place, most everyone on the translation committee arrived with suspicions. And those suspicions were quickly confirmed.”

Read an Excerpt from The Drunken Silenus

“EARLY IN HIS ADULT LIFE, Peter Paul Rubens, the famous painter—though he was not yet famous at the time—took a trip to Italy with his apprentice Deodat del Monte. Rubens had been living in Antwerp with his mother. He wasn’t born in Antwerp, he was born in Siegen, in what is now Germany but was, at the time, not the unified country that it is today. Rubens was born in the time before nation-states as we know them existed. Before the French Revolution, before Bismarck, before Napoleon. Rubens was born in Siegen because his father had been in prison there, or thereabouts. That’s another part of the story we’ll get into later, the arrest and near execution of Rubens’s father.”

Hotly in Pursuit of the Real - Ron Hansen

Hotly in Pursuit of the Real Reviewed

“Hotly in Pursuit of the Real is a coy memoir. It is offered by a man who deftly sculpts his persona, a memoirist apparently schooled in both Midwestern reticence and the decorous manners of an old-school intelligentsia.”

Read an Excerpt from World Without End

World Without End, Claude Wilkinson’s fourth poetry collection, takes its title from the last words of the Gloria Patri. But the preceding words—“as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be”— also echo the book’s overarching theme: the seemingly infinite spiritual implications woven throughout our experience in the natural world.

Read an Excerpt from God’s Liar

“Yes, it is true: I knew John Milton. I let the words stand on the page, the ink still wet. It has taken me all of three weeks to find the courage to write this letter…”

Long After Lauds Reviewed

“It has been said that the artist is one who feels everything more deeply, the beautiful as well as the terrible, and builds of those feelings shelters where others can safely and sacredly process their own. Jeanine Hathaway is such an artist, Long after Lauds is such a collection.”

Read an Excerpt from Hotly in Pursuit of the Real

“Even as a high school student my fictions were not about me. I tilted toward what Edgar Allan Poe called “Arabesques,” or what others might consider tales from The Twilight Zone. I didn’t find my life interesting enough, so I invented. “

Slant Goes Full-Time

Wipf & Stock, a growing publisher based in the Pacific Northwest, is proud to announce that it has hired Gregory Wolfe to expand his imprint, Slant, into an ambitious line of literary works intended for the trade market.